Ob-gyn guidelines often based on opinion, weak data

I am not sure of the intent of the article below as although guidelines may not be based on good, solid evidence (which is often in scarce supply), that is no reason for experts not to work together to create guidelines that are based on the best available evidence and experience. If we did not have guidelines for clinical practice, we would not have a standard to inform best clinical care. The guidelines that are created may well turn out to be ineffective, inappropriate or otherwise unworkable, and on that basis they would be reviewed and changed if necessary.

Link

Solid evidence is often missing from the practice guidelines used by obstetrician-gynecologists ...

Less than a third of the recommendations from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) are based on gold-standard scientific experiments ...

The rest are based on ... expert opinion, which is subject to personal biases ...

"That is often the fall-back when there is no data," ... expert opinion is helpful in pointing out what we don't know, but might not always translate into what's best for patients.

... Guidelines help doctors keep up with the latest developments in their fields and are widely perceived as a recipe for good patient care.

But there is often surprisingly little hard data behind them ...

... guidelines panels conduct extensive reviews of the medical literature to find all relevant evidence and also take care to exclude experts with financial conflicts of interest.

... those are two key elements in creating good guidelines.

... "For many of the recommendations there simply is not enough data, or it is disputed," ... "So there has to be a role for expert opinion."

Visit my website to explore birthing services.